Bone Broth Common Mistakes

Bone broth is everywhere these days. Learn how to make it at home by avoiding the most common mistakes.

Toasted Garlic Beef Stock made with the bone broth instructions you’ll find here

We know. We know: Bone broth. It’s almost too hip for its own good. But whether you consider it a miracle cure for all ailments, or just a hearty broth to sip on during cold winter months, it’s a cooking project worth tackling. That said, poorly made bone broth can be about as palatable as, well, a bowl full of bones. Avoid these common mistakes, and your bone broth will be the hottest ticket in town—or at least your kitchen.

1. Skipping the Blanching Step

If you think bone broth is too funky, you’ve probably had to suffer through a mug or bowl that was made without blanching. This step, to be done before roasting and boiling, removes any impurities (read: the nasty bits) from the bones. And if you’re using the right bones, there will be some nasty bits. A real bone broth is made with bones and cuts of meat high in collagen, like marrow, knuckles, and feet. While beef is the meat most people associate with bone broth, it can also be made with lamb, pork, chicken, veal… you name it. A word on these collagen-heavy bones: They make for a stock that’s gelatinous at room temperature. Don’t let the texture of this meat Jell-O alarm you; that’s a sign you did it right. To blanch, cover the bones with cold water, bring to a boil, and let them cook at an aggressive simmer for 20 minutes before draining and roasting (see mistake no. 2!).

this might take 2 stock pots
takes my largest pot

2. Not Roasting the Bones

Repeat after us: “I will always roast my bones.” This browns and caramelizes them, and we all know what browned and caramelized means: Better flavor. Don’t be afraid to really take the bones to the limit: Crank the oven up high—a bold 450˚, says senior food editor Andy Baraghani. Lily Freedman, test kitchen contributor, also adds that you have to put in ample oven time. A quick 15 minutes won’t do: Take those bones right up to the edge of “too done.” Once you’re ready to boil the bones, don’t waste the crisped brown bits on the bottom of the pan; loosen them with a little water and a metal spatula, and add those to your stockpot. This adds flavor to the finished broth.

roasting at 450 degrees

3. Adding Too Much “Stuff”

According to Baraghani, a good bone broth doesn’t need much more than bones and a few choice aromatics, like onions, garlic, and black pepper. “Don’t even get me started on carrots,” he says, which add sweetness. (We won’t dock points if you choose to add them, however; a little sweet can help balance the deeply savory quality of bone broth). But ultimately, this is not the best place to dump all of your compost scraps. Keep the flavor focused and concentrated. Worried about it tasting “one-note”? Just roast the bones to build depth of flavor, and that won’t be an issue.

4. Not Using a Large Enough Stockpot

Those femur bones you’re using? They’re pretty big. This is not a task for your 4-quart sauce pot, says senior associate food editor Claire Saffitz. Use the biggest, heaviest stockpot you’ve got, and fill it up with your roasted bones, plus your (carefully curated) selection of aromatics. Add just enough water to cover, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer, and cover. “There shouldn’t be so much water that the bones are floating,” Saffitz explains. The bone-to-water ratio should be close enough that the resulting broth is intensely flavored. Adding too much liquid will make it taste, well, watered down.

5. Not Simmering It Long Enough

Q: How long can you simmer a bone broth? A: How much time have you got? Saffitz recently made one that she kept on the stove overnight. Because the bones used are thick and hardy, they have a lot of flavor to offer up. This is in contrast to a simpler broth, like basic chicken stock: Those smaller, thinner bones will disintegrate after hours on the heat, and won’t add much more flavor.

6. Letting the Finished Broth Cool Slowly

Not to alarm you, but hot broth can be a breeding ground for bacteria—and not the good kind. “Cool it as quickly and efficiently as possible,” says Saffitz. This will also keep the broth fresher for longer. Once you’ve strained out the bones, she recommends adding ice and transferring it to a shallow and wide container, where it will lose heat more rapidly. Don’t worry about the ice diluting the broth; it’s so intensely flavored (you did roast the bones and simmer them for a heck of a long time, right?) that a few cups of cubes won’t drastically impact the flavor. One thing’s for sure: Don’t put screaming-hot broth in the fridge. Not only will it invite bacterial growth, it will raise the temperature of the refrigerator and potentially contaminate the rest of its contents.

the finished product

How do YOU use your bone broth? I like mine straight up or I use it for the recipe in the first image (posting soon). I use it most for (beef) pressure cooking.

Classic Short Beef Ribs in an Instapot

Beef Short Ribs

Classic Short Beef Ribs with Red Wine in an InstantPot

★★★★★

Practically falling off the bone tender, this recipe made a convert out of me.

INSTAPOT/Pressure Cooking, Meats

INGREDIENTS

3-5 pounds short ribs

2 TBSP oil for sautéing 

2 cups beef/chicken broth (or water)

1 cup red wine (or additional broth)

 cups onion in 1” dice

4 cloves of garlic, minced

2 TBSP vinegar

2 TBSP soy sauce

2 TBSP Worcestershire sauce

1 TBSP brown sugar

1 tsp dried basil

 tsp thyme

1 bay leaf

1/2 tsp pepper

3 TBSP flour

½ cup water

DESCRIPTION

Mouthwatering, nearly fall off the bone short ribs 

DIRECTIONS

Hit Sauté and when the display says HOT, add the oil. Swirl it around to coat the pan and add the ribs. Brown the ribs well on all sides. Browning greatly improves the flavor. Transfer the ribs to a plate and add the broth and wine to the pot. Thoroughly deglaze it by using a wooden spoon to scrape ALL the browned bits off the bottom. Do not skip this step or the Instant Pot may interpret the stuck bits as burning food. That can result in the dreaded Burn warning.

Add all the other ingredients except the flour and water. 

All assembled and ready to pressure cook

Return the ribs to the pot and turn to coat all sides with the sauce. Secure the lid and make sure the valve is set to Sealing. Push the Pressure Cook (or Manual) button. Adjust the time using the + and – buttons to get to 40 minutes. When it beeps that it’s done, leave it for 15 minutes natural release.

While it’s releasing pressure, whisk the flour and water until smooth. Flip the valve from Sealing to Venting for a quick release of any remaining pressure and when the pin drops, remove the lid. Carefully transfer the ribs to a warm platter and cover them with foil to keep them warm. 

Hit Sauté and whisk the flour/water slurry again to freshen it. When the broth comes to a boil, add about half the flour slurry. Bring back to a boil to thicken. Add more slurry if you like a thicker gravy but don’t get carried away. It will thicken a little more as it cools a bit and you don’t want porridge. Taste and adjust seasoning and prepare for Oooos and AHHHs.

One thing I always do is to use a fat separator for any gravy made by a pressure cooker. This one by OXO is amazing and can be put in the dishwasher 🙌🏻

Oxo gravy fat separator

Fresh 🍓Strawberry Pie 🥧

Fresh Strawberry Pie

Nothing I like better than to buy a couple flats of strawberries in season, to make my favorite recipes 🍓

Fresh Strawberry Pie
★★★★★
Baked goods, Desserts
Makes 8 servings – source: Cooking Light
INGREDIENTS

Crust:
50 Reduced calorie vanilla wafers
¼ cup butter or stick margarine melted
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon grated orange rind
cooking spray
Filling:
2 cups ripe strawberries
½ cup water
⅔ cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
6 cups small ripe strawberries
½ cup frozen reduced calorie whipped topping thawed and divided
(I used fresh whipped cream 🙂
DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven.

To prepare crust, place wafers in a food processor and process until finely ground. Add butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, and orange rind, and pulse 10 times or just until wafers are moist. Press into bottom and up sides of a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes, cool on a wire rack.

To prepare filling, mash 2 cups strawberries with a potato masher. Combine mashed strawberries and water in a small saucepan; bring to a boil and cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Press the strawberry mixture through a sieve into a bowl, and reserve 1 cup strawberry liquid (add enough water to measure 1 cup, if necessary). Discard pulp.Combine 2/3 cup sugar and cornstarch in a pan; add strawberry liquid, stirring well with a whisk.

Bring to a boil; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Reduce heat, and cook 2 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in lemon juice.

Arrange a layer of small strawberries, stem sides down, in the crust. Spoon about one-third of sauce over the strawberries. Arrange the remaining strawberries on top, spooning the remaining sauce over the strawberries.

Chill for at least 3 hours.

Serve with whipped topping. Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 wedge and 1 tablespoon whipped topping).

Calories 285 (27% from fat); Fat 8.5 grams (sat 4.6g, mono 2.5g, poly 0.9g); protein 1.9 g; Carb 52.2g; Fiber 3.5g; chol 16mg; iron 1.2mg; sodium 146mg; Calc 42mg

Spicy Hot Mess Crab 🦀 Legs with garlic, butter & parsley

Spicy Hot Mess Crab 🦀 Legs

If garlic bread and crab boil had a baby, this would surely be it! Sweet dungeness crab gets tossed in the classic garlic bread mixture — garlic, butter, and parsley — and served with crusty bread to soak up any extra butter. It is a bit messy, but feel free to use the bread as a tasty napkin!

Spicy Hot Mess Crab Legs with Garlic, Butter, and Parsley

★★★★★

Seafood

INGREDIENTS

3 to 4 Dungeness crab clusters, thawed

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 large garlic cloves, minced

¼ to ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Kosher salt

½ lemon

Crusty bread for serving and dipping

DIRECTIONS

SEPARATE CRAB

Separate the crab legs from the body. Using a sturdy knife cut the bodies in half.

STEAM CRAB

Place the crab into a wok or skillet with 1 inch of water and bring to a boil. Cover and steam just until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain well and wipe out the pan.

STIR-FRY

Return the pan to medium-high heat and add the butter, oil, garlic, and as much red pepper flakes as desired, and sauté just until sizzling. Add the crab, parsley, and a pinch of salt, and stir-fry until coated with the sizzling mixture. Transfer to a deep platter, scraping all of the butter and aromatics on top and add a squeeze of lemon. Serve right away with claw crackers, bread, and lots of napkins. Dip the crab meat and bread into the surrounding butter and enjoy!

10 ways to fight back against woke culture

By Bari Weiss

I realize the faddish thing to say these days is that we live in the worst, most broken and backward country in the world and maybe in the history of civilization. It’s utter nonsense.

I have a few basic litmus tests in my own life: Can I wear a tank top in public? Can I walk down the street holding the hand of my partner, a (beautiful) woman, in many places in America without getting a second glance? Can I wear a Jewish star without fear?

I do not take those things for granted. I know very well that in many other places, the answers would be different, and my life wouldn’t be possible at all.

America is imperfect. (Does it even need to be said?) There is bigotry toward blacks and gays and Jews and immigrants; there is intense polarization; political violence is becoming more regular; elected representatives believe conspiracy theories. All true here as in many other countries being torn apart by the dislocations of the 21st century.

But there is no gulag in America. There are no laws permitting honor killings. There is no formal social credit system of the kind that exists right now in China. By any measure, we have achieved incredible progress and enjoy extraordinary freedoms. And yet people aren’t acting that way. They are acting, increasingly, like subjects in a totalitarian country.

These people write to me daily. They admit to regularly censoring themselves at work and with friends; succumbing to social pressure to tweet the right hashtag; to parroting slogans they do not believe to protect their livelihoods, like the greengrocer in Václav Havel’s famous essay “The Power of the Powerless.”

These people aren’t crazy. They are scared for good reason.

How much does it cost me to log on to Twitter and accuse you, right now, of an -ism? America is fast developing its own informal social credit system, as the writer Rod Dreher has noted, in which people with the wrong politics or online persona are banned from social media sites and online financial networks.

When everything is recorded for eternity, when making mistakes and taking risks are transformed into capital offenses, when things that were common sense until two seconds ago become unsayable, people make the understandable decision to simply shut up.

Do not nod along when you hear the following: That Abraham Lincoln’s name on a public school or his likeness on a statue is white supremacy. (It is not; he is a hero.) That separating people into racial affinity groups is progressive. (It is a form of segregation.) That looting has no victims (untrue) and that small-business owners can cope anyway because they have insurance (nonsense). That any disparity of outcome is evidence of systemic oppression (false). That America is evil. (It is the last hope on Earth.)

This list could go on for a thousand pages. These may have become conventional wisdom in certain circles, but they are lies.

Yet too many good people are sacrificing the common good, and therefore their long-term security, for the sake of short-term comfort.

Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco is at risk of being renamed by woke city leaders.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File

It’s time to stand up and fight back. That means you. Social conservatives. Never-Trump Republicans, and anti-anti-Trump Republicans, too. Lukewarm liberals and libertarians. Progressives who have a little curiosity still left. Exhausted parents who want nothing to do with politics. Joe Rogan stans. Reddit revolutionaries and the hedgies getting crushed. Facebookers and email chainers and Etsy-shop owners and Boomers who still use AOL accounts. Start with the following 10 principles:

1. Remind yourself, right now, of the following truth: You are free.

Bari Weiss

It’s true that we live in an upside-down time in which pressing the “like” button on the wrong thing can bring untold consequences. But giving in to those who seek to confine you only hurts you in the long run. Your loss of self is the most significant thing that could be taken away from you. Don’t give it up for anything.

2. Be honest.

Do not say anything about yourself or others that you know is false. Absolutely refuse to let your mind be colonized. The first crazy thing someone asks you to believe or to profess, refuse. If you can, do so out loud. There is a good chance it will inspire others to speak up, too.

3. Stick to your principles.

If you are a decent person, you know mob justice is never just. So never join a mob. Ever. Even if you agree with the mob. If you are a decent person, you know betraying friends is wrong. So if a friend or a colleague does something you disagree with, write them a private note. Don’t be a snitch. Any mob that comes for them will come for you.

4. Set an example for your kids and your community.

That means being courageous. I understand that it’s hard. Really hard. But in other times and places, including in our own nation, people have made far greater sacrifices. (Think of those “honored dead” who “gave the last full measure of devotion.”) If enough people make the leap, we will achieve something like herd immunity. Jump.

5. If you don’t like it, leave it.

A class in college, a job, anything. Get out and do your own thing. I fully understand the impulse to want to change things from within. And by all means: Try as hard as you can. But if the leopard is currently eating the face of the person at the cubicle next to yours, I promise it’s not going to refrain from eating yours if you post the black square on Instagram.

6. Become more self-reliant.

If you can learn to use a power drill, do it. If you’ve always wanted an outdoor solar hot tub, make one. Learn to poach an egg or shoot a gun. Most importantly: Get it in your head that platforms are not neutral. If you don’t believe me, look at Parler and look at Robinhood. To the extent that you can build your life to be self-reliant and not 100 percent reliant on the Web, it’s a good thing. It will make you feel competent and powerful. Which you are.

7. Worship God more than Yale.

In other words, do not lose sight of what is essential. Professional prestige is not essential. Being popular is not essential. Getting your child into an elite preschool is not essential. Doing the right thing is essential. Telling the truth is essential. Protecting your kids is essential.

8. Make like-minded friends.

Then stand up for them. Two good tests: Are they willing to tell the truth even if it hurts their own side? And do they think that humor should never be a casualty, no matter how bleak the circumstances? These people are increasingly rare. When you find them, hold on tight.

9. Trust your own eyes and ears.

Rely on firsthand information from people you trust rather than on media spin. When you hear someone making generalizations about a group of people, imagine they are talking about you and react accordingly. If people insist on spouting back headlines and talking points, make them prove it, in their own words.

10. Use your capital to build original, interesting and generative things right now. This minute.

Every day I hear from those with means with children at private schools who are being brainwashed; people who run companies where they are scared of their own employees; people who donate to their alma mater even though it betrays their principles. Enough. You have the ability to build new things. If you don’t have the financial capital, you have the social or political capital. Or the ability to sweat. The work of our lifetimes is the Great Build. Let’s go.

Bari Weiss is the author of “How to Fight Anti-Semitism.” Follow her writings at: bariweiss.substack.com.

Bacon and Egg Puff Pastry Tart

A creamy cheesy Puff Pastry Tart with poached eggs, bacon and some delish greens on top.

Bacon & Egg Puff Pastry Tart

Bacon and Egg Puff Pastry Tart

★★★★★

Breakfast, Eggs

INGREDIENTS

1 cup grated Gruyere cheese

1/2 cup crème fraîche

1 lemon, juiced and zested (divided)

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

1 sheet store bought Puff Pastry, thawed

1 egg, beaten

2-3 tablespoons This Is Everything Seasoning

6 slices cooked bacon

Toppings

4 eggs, poached

1 cup upland cress or arugula

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons chives to garnish

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Mix gruyere cheese and créme fraiche in a small bowl. Season with salt, pepper and lemon zest to taste. Set aside.

Roll out the puff pastry sheet on a lightly floured surface to make a large rectangle just smaller than a half sheet pan. Place on a parchment lined sheet pan. Create a border by scoring with a knife, an inch from the edges. Dock the dough by poking holes with a fork in the center area. Brush the border edges with beaten egg and sprinkle with This Is Everything. Refrigerate dough for 10 minutes.

Spread cheese mixture in the center of the pastry dough. Place the bacon on top. Bake for 15-20 minutes until puffed and golden. Remove from the oven.

While the tart is baking, poach the eggs. Toss upland cress with the olive oil, and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Remove the tart from the oven, add the poached eggs and break open, garnish with the upland cress salad and chives. Serve immediately

Them Apples 🍎 🍏🍎 – a recipe for an Apple Dutch Baby

I love fresh fruit from an orchard and had been looking for a source for apples, when I found honeycrisp.com.

Honeycrisp Apples

The apples in the image above were shipped to me in October. Yes, 4 months ago. I ordered a bushel. I was saving these to take with us on our month of travel in January, but they got left behind. I wasn’t sure what condition they’d be in, but they’ll be pie filling and apple sauce by day’s end.

But FIRST, an Apple Dutch Baby

Apple Dutch Baby

★★★★★

Breakfast, Pancakes

INGREDIENTS

4 Tbsp butter

2-3 Gala apples sliced thinly (I used Honeycrisp)

3/4 C flour

3/4 C milk

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 tsp baking powder

1 Tbsp sugar

4 eggs

Cinnamon Topping:

1/2 C sugar

2 tsp cinnamon

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 400.

Place butter into a 12″ cast iron frying pan and place in the oven to melt butter.

In a bowl combine the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, milk and eggs.

Place the sliced apples into the bottom of the pan on top of the melted butter. Pour egg mixture over apples.

Combine sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle over the top of the egg mixture evenly.

Bake in oven for 20-25 minutes until golden brown.

This handy device makes quick work of the coring, peeling and slicing. Just love it. It’s made by Cucina Pro.

Apple peeler in action demo by hubby 😍
Prior to adding topping (which I almost FORGOT to add)
that’s better
You know it’s good if a piece is gone before you’re finished photographing it 😎

I made two batches of apple pie filling but decided to freeze them.

Apple 🍎 pie 🥧 filling

And last but not least, the Instapot No Peel Apple sauce.

Applesauce in 4 Instapot minutes
Instapot No Peel applesauce

EASY Homemade Wonton Soup 🍵

Gina does it again. Her new book has the recipe for homemade wontons.

Easy Wonton Soup

Easy Wonton Soup

Asian, Soups, Quick

INGREDIENTS

6 cups chicken broth low sodium

1– inch piece fresh ginger, sliced thin

1 clove minced garlic

20 mini frozen wontons, I love the Chicken Cilantro one’s from Trader Joe’s

1 1/2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms

4 baby bok choy, halved lengthwise and halved

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

scallions, sliced green parts only for garnish

DIRECTIONS

Bring chicken broth to a boil in a large pot.

Smash the sliced ginger with the side of a knife to bring out the flavor and add to the pot with the garlic, cover and cook 5 minutes.

Add the bok choy and partially cook 5 minutes, then add the frozen wontons and mushroom, simmer for 2 to 3 minutes, until the wontons are heated through and bok choy is tender and wilted.

Stir in soy sauce and sesame oil.

Divide soup in four bowls. Garnish with fresh scallions.

NUTRITION

136 Cals 9 Protein 22.5 Carbs 2 Fats
Serving: 11/2 cup (generous), Calories: 136kcal, Carbohydrates: 22.5g, Protein: 9g, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 0.5g, Cholesterol: 6.5mg, Sodium: 1218mg, Fiber: 2.5g, Sugar: 5g Blue Smart Points: 2 Green Smart Points: 2 Purple Smart Points: 2